Barbara A. Walsh

Barbara A. Walsh

Barbara is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has worked for newspapers in Ireland, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Florida. While working at the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune, Walsh reported on first-degree killer William Horton Jr. and Massachusetts’ flawed prison-furlough system. The series changed in-state sentencing and furlough laws and won a 1988 Pulitzer Prize. During her career at the Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram, Barbara wrote in-depth series on several social issues in Maine. Many of her stories changed laws and earned national, state and regional awards. Barbara is also the author of an adult biography/memoir, August Gale: A Father and Daughter’s Journey into the Storm, and Sammy in the Sky, a children’s book illustrated by Jamie Wyeth. She lives on a lake in Maine with her two daughters, husband and Paco, a rescue dog from Puerto Rico. When she is not writing, taking pictures or walking Paco, she can be found sitting by the lake, comforted by its blue-green waters.


LATEST ARTICLES

Playing God with public health

Playing God with public health

Seven weeks after officiating the now infamous East Millinocket wedding that has resulted in the deaths of eight Maine residents, Sanford pastor Todd Bell continues to defy state and local orders aimed at controlling the spread of COVID-19.

The preacher and the outbreak

The preacher and the outbreak

For the Sanford pastor at the center of the East Millinocket wedding, sin is ‘a pandemic worse than the coronavirus.’ Now his church has multiple COVID-19 cases.

Zooming a final goodbye

Zooming a final goodbye

Unable to be by their dying mother’s bedside due to coronavirus restrictions, a family gathers on Zoom to tell their mother they loved her.

The Last Responders: Consoling the dying and grieving in the COVID-19 era

The Last Responders: Consoling the dying and grieving in the COVID-19 era

The coronavirus pandemic’s last responders – Maine’s priests, chaplains, funeral directors and hospice workers − say the highly infectious virus has upended how they do their jobs. Barred from entering most hospitals and long-term living facilities, chaplains and priests must offer comfort, consolation and prayers electronically. Families are robbed of a final goodbye, and those who are dying of COVID − or any other illness in a confined setting – must die with strangers while longing for the touch of a loved one.

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